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Whether you’re trying to minimize power consumption, maximize board space, increase speed, or do everything at once, Micron MCPs can drive your design no matter the application. Our fully tested, stackable MCPs and PoPs are the small form factors your mobile designs need.

And because we manufacture all the memory elements of our MCPs—NAND Flash, NOR Flash, and Mobile LPDRAM—we can offer MCP/PoP solutions with a variety of packages and technology options; please contact us for more information. 

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For NAND-Based MCP (3)
Title & Description Secure ID# Updated Type
Micron MCP Memory Solutions for Cellular M2M Applications: (PDF 817.33 KB) Designers are increasingly turning to multichip package (MCP) solutions to achieve the smallest possible footprint while providing more density and better performance for M2M module designs. 02/2014 Product Flyer
MCP Product Flyer: (PDF 251.77 KB)An overview of how Micron's MCPs deliver the right combination of form factor, speed, and power. 08/2012 Product Flyer
Micron Small Form Factor PoP Helps Gumstix: (PDF 171.59 KB)Micron's PoP NAND Flash/LPDRAM solution provides performance in small form factor for Gumstix' Linux-based, single-board computers. 12/2009 Case Study
For Multichip Packages (15)
Title & Description Secure ID# Updated Type
Nonvolatile Memory for Multiple Markets : (PDF 177.33 KB)Describes why Micron NVM is the best fit for your applications 01/2014 Product Flyer
Routing Guidelines for Micron’s HMC-15G-SR: (PDF 3.3 MB)Provides sound methods, proven solutions, and detailed PCB layout guidelines to enable successful designs using Micron’s HMC. TN-43-03 HMC TN-43-03 06/2013 Technical Note
Recommended Soldering Parameters: (PDF 173.37 KB)Defines the recommended soldering techniques and parameters for Micron Technology, Inc., products. TN-00-15 12/2012 Technical Note
NOR MCP Part Numbering System: (PDF 59.36 KB)Part numbering guide for Micron NOR MCP products. 09/2012 Part Numbering Guide
Micron e-MMC Embedded Memory – Mobile Applications: (PDF 275.45 KB)Micron's e·MMC embedded memory, which combines our high-quality,low-cost NAND Flash memory with a high-speed MultiMediaCard (MMC) controller in a low-profile BGA package, is an ideal mass storage solution for mobile applications. 08/2012 Product Flyer
TN-10-21: Qualcomm QSC6695 Register Settings: (PDF 482.14 KB)Rev. 1.0 TN-10-21 12/2011 Technical Note
TN-10-21: Qualcomm QSC6695 Validation Report: (PDF 336.51 KB)Rev. 1.0 TN-10-21 12/2011 Technical Note
PoP User Guide: (PDF 846.18 KB)Provides several well-established guidelines for package-on-package (PoP) semiconductor package design and assembly, which requires unique considerations in both the up-front design and the manufacturing process. CSN-34 08/2011 Customer Service Note
Bypass Capacitor Selection for High-Speed Designs: (PDF 481.9 KB)Describes bypass capacitor selection for high-speed designs. TN-00-06 03/2011 Technical Note
Micron Wire-Bonding Techniques: (PDF 66.13 KB)This technical note provides guidance on wire bonding techniques for both nickel-palladium (NiPd) and aluminum (Al) bond pads on Micron products. TN-00-22 11/2010 Technical Note
Uprating of Semiconductors for High-Temperature Applications: (PDF 428.33 KB)Describes the issues associated with temperature uprating and the risks involved in using components and/or systems outside the manufacturer's environmental specifications TN-00-18 05/2010 Technical Note
Accelerate Design Cycles with Simulation Models: (PDF 206.91 KB)Micron supplies the tools and guidelines necessary to verify new designs prior to layout. This technical note discusses software model support, signal integrity optimization, and logic circuit design. TN-00-09 02/2010 Technical Note
Understanding Signal Integrity: (PDF 1.64 MB)Describes how memory design, test, and verification tools can be used to the greatest advantage, from conception of a new product through end of life TN-00-20 12/2009 Technical Note
IBIS Behavioral Models: (PDF 163.98 KB)Micron has been a member of the IBIS Open Forum for many years and fully supports the IBIS specification. IBIS models for most Micron products are available for download from the Micron Web site. TN-00-07 11/2009 Technical Note
FBGA Decoder: Micron's FBGA Part Marking Decoder makes it easier to understand part marking. Tool
For Products and Support (14)
Title & Description Secure ID# Updated Type
Shipping Quantities: (PDF 1.22 MB)Provides standard part quantities for shipping. CSN-04 03/2014 Customer Service Note
RMA Procedures for Packaged Product and Bare Die Devices: (PDF 76.22 KB)Outlines standard returned material authorization (RMA) procedures, as well as the differences associated with bare die RMAs. CSN-07 01/2014 Customer Service Note
Product Marks/Product and Packaging Labels: (PDF 1.39 MB)Explains product part marking, and product and packaging labels. CSN-11 01/2014 Customer Service Note
Wafer Packaging and Packaging Materials: (PDF 591.42 KB)Provides complete shipping and recycling information about each of the materials used for shipping Micron's products. CSN-20 11/2013 Customer Service Note
Thermal Applications: (PDF 246.79 KB)Describes some considerations in thermal applications for Micron memory devices TN-00-08 07/2013 Technical Note
Moisture Absorption in Plastic Packages: (PDF 97.08 KB)Describes shipping procedures for preventing memory devices from absorbing moisture and recommendations for baking devices exposed to excessive moisture TN-00-01 02/2013 Technical Note
Micron Component and Module Packaging: (PDF 1.41 MB)Explanation of Micron packaging labels and procedures. CSN-16 01/2013 Customer Service Note
Micron BGA Manufacturer's User Guide: (PDF 388.76 KB)Provides information to enable customers to easily integrate both leading-edge and legacy Micron's ball grid array (BGA) packages into their manufacturing processes. It is intended as a set of high-level guidelines and a reference manual describing typical package-related and manufacturing process-flow practices. CSN-33 12/2012 Customer Service Note
Electronic Data Interchange: (PDF 52.45 KB)Describes EDI transmission sets, protocol, and contacts. CSN-06 11/2012 Customer Service Note
PCN/EOL Systems: (PDF 79.21 KB)Explains Micron's product change notification and end-of-life systems. CSN-12 04/2012 Customer Service Note
Lead Frame Package User Guidelines: (PDF 245.66 KB)Discusses Micron's lead-frame package options CSN-30 05/2011 Customer Service Note
ESD Precautions for Die/Wafer Handling and Assembly: (PDF 120.81 KB)Describes the benefits of controlling ESD in the workplace, including higher yields and improved quality and reliability, resulting in reduced manufacturing costs. CSN-24 08/2010 Customer Service Note
Micron KGD Definitions: (PDF 65.52 KB)Describes the testing specifications and parameters for Micron's KGD-C1 and KGD-C2 DRAM die. CSN-22 07/2009 Customer Service Note
Bare Die SiPs and MCMs: (PDF 151.06 KB)Describes design considerations for bare die SiPs and MCMs. CSN-18 04/2009 Customer Service Note

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NAND-Based MCP FAQs (14)

Can I use a discrete package with the OMAP35x?
The PoP versions of the OMAP35x (package designations, CBC and CBB) are specifically designed to take advantage of the PoP interface for the NAND and Mobile LPDDR signals through the top of the OMAP package. However, you can route the NAND and Mobile LPDDR signals out of the bottom of the OMAP to a discrete package. The nonPoP OMAP35x package (package designation CUS) is specifically designed to use discrete memory packages.
Do I use only Mobile LPDDR with the OMAP35x, or can I use a standard SDR/DDR/DDR2/DDR3 part?
The OMAP35x is only compatible with Mobile LPDRAM. Standard SDR/DDR/DDR2/DDR3 is not supported.
Do you have any reliability data on the PoP?
Yes. We do have reliability data on the PoP. Contact Micron for more information.
For a PoP/MCP, does the qualification testing at the factory differ from testing on the discrete components?
No. the PoP/MCP parts undergo the same qualification testing as the discrete components.
How do I know the Micron part number for the part on the Beagle Board?
The Beagle Board uses our NAND + Mobile LPDDR PoP combination parts, and the densities vary depending on which version of the Beagle Board you have. Type the second 5-digit alphanumeric code on the physical part into our FBGA Decoder, which will provide you with the corresponding Micron part number.
I am using the Logic Zoom OMAP35x kit. What is the Micron part number for the part used on this platform?
The Logic Zoom OMAP35x kit uses our NAND + Mobile LPDDR PoP combination parts, and the densities vary depending on which Logic Zoom OMAP35x kit that you have. Type the second 5-digit alphanumeric code on the physical part into our FBGA Decoder, which will provide you with the corresponding Micron part number.
I’ve heard that opting for a PoP/MCP solution is more expensive than using discretes, so why should I use it?
From a system-solution perspective, because the PoP mates directly onto the processor, it eliminates the need to have traces routed on the PCB. This saves costs for the customer, as well as provides better signal integrity.
Our contract manufacturer has little experience with PoP. Why should we try something new?
The market is driving the requirement for the smaller PoP form factor, and several contract manufacturers have already enabled this technology. PoP can help save in routing costs and improve signal integrity. Given those cost and performance advantages, Micron recommends that you work very closely with your CM to ensure a good transition to this technology. Micron worked closely with Texas Instruments (TI) on the technical notes PCB Design Guidelines Part I and PCB Assembly Guidelines Part II. These can also help provide guidelines to help you work with your CM for the best success on your conversion to PoP.
We designed in discrete parts, but now we are using PoP parts. They appear to be limited in what speeds we can achieve. What is the problem?
When moving from testing with discrete parts to PoP, care should be taken that no stubs are left from the design containing the discrete components. If needed, a 0 Ohm resistor could isolate the memory from the traces used for the discrete part.
What are your PoP/MCP offerings for x8 NAND and/or x16 Mobile LPDDR?
Our standard offerings are x16 NAND and x32 Mobile LPDDR. We also have x8 NAND and x16 Mobile LPDDR. For the most current information, contact your local Micron support.
What is an MCP? What is a PoP? What is the difference between the two devices?
MCP is multichip package that contains multiple die and can be used by any controller. PoP is a form of an MCP made specifically to stack on top of a processor that has pads on the top side that mate to the ballout of the PoP. Because the PoP package stacks right on top of the processor, it eliminates the need to have traces routed on the PCB and provides better signal integrity. A variety of PoP packages are designed for various processors. PoP and MCP devices give designers the ability to take advantage of z space and to provide the flexibility to offer different logic in one package (for example, NAND + Mobile LPDDR or e-MMC™ + NAND + Mobile LPDDR). We have a wide selection of offerings to meet our customer’s needs.
What is the maximum amount of memory that Micron can support on the OMAP35x processors?
Micron works closely with Texas Instruments (TI) to validate and optimize our parts for the OMAP35x processors. As we work with the OMAP35x team, the list of validated memory devices expands frequently. For the most current information, contact your local Micron support, or send an e-mail to mcpsupport@micron.com.
What parts have been validated for TI OMAP processors?
Micron works closely with Texas Instruments (TI) to validate and optimize our parts for the OMAP35x processors. As we work with the OMAP35x team, the list of validated memory devices expands frequently. For the most current information, contact your local Micron support, or send an e-mail to mcpsupport@micron.com.
What PoP/MCP parts have been validated with the OMAP35x?
Micron works closely with Texas Instruments (TI) to validate and optimize our parts for the OMAP35x processors. As we work with the OMAP35x team, the list of validated memory devices expands frequently. For the most current information, contact your local Micron support, or contact Micron Product Technical Support. Be sure to select MCP for the quickest response time.

Multichip Packages FAQs (5)

What is a "bank"?
A bank is an array of memory bits. Multiple arrays or banks are contained within a DRAM component. Depending on density, DRAM components may consist of 4 or 8 banks. For example, a bank may consist of 32 million rows, 4 bits across. This would equate to 128 megabits. Four of these banks in a single DRAM component would yield a 512Mb component.
What is the impedance tolerance of the driver in match-impedance mode relative to the expected value base on the perfect reference resistor connected to ZQ pin?
The impedance tolerance of the driver is ±15 percent.
Does thermal information change for IT parts?
Thermal information includes temperature limits and thermal impedance values. Temperature limits do change for IT parts (TC, TJ, and TA), but thermal impedance values (θJA, θJB, and θJC) do not because thermal impedance depends primarily on the package.
My design was based on a specification stating the JTAG was relative to VDD (1.8V), but now we’ve discovered that JTAG is actually relative to VDDQ (1.5V). It’s a fairly significant board spin to change this; what do I risk by leaving the design as-is? I assume that the specification is still for VDDQ + 0.3V = 1.8V, but with CMOS parts there’s no way I can guarantee that it won’t swing past that on transitions.
Your particular board design should not be a cause of major concern. The pins can handle the VDD voltage regardless of the VDDQ voltage.
Should the ECC memory chip share chip select and CKE signals with the other two main memory chips in our point-to-point application?
The ECC chip(s) should share the same CKE and CS# as the other devices because they are accessed as the same piece of data.

Products and Support FAQs (1)

Who do I contact if I have questions about my buymicron.com order?
If you have any questions about your order, contact buymicron.com.

PCM-based MCPs take cell phone performance to the next level

July 27, 2012 by Brian Bradford

Phase change memory (PCM) in the mobile handset market is a game-changer because of its performance, software simplification, and reliability. Cell phones today have enabled NAND-based MCP solutions for read operations and random access capabilities; however, Micron’s PCM-based MCP solution will enable cell phone users to enjoy new experiences. “Instant-on” is becoming a reality thanks to the performance of Micron’s PCM and low-power double data rate mobile DRAM...Read More

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